Spring/Summer 2015 Pringle of Scotland

Massimo Nicosia wanted to incorporate plenty of Pringle of Scotland’s almost 200-year history into his Spring ’15 collection. He did it in a very contemporary, perhaps even futuristic way, continuing his experiments in 3-D printing, a technique he first employed (to much acclaim) for Fall. This time around, Nicosia created a nylon-powder chain mail. Assembled with panels of woven cotton and silk, it was used for airy, funky tops and a dress. “I wanted to combine the artificial and the natural,” Nicosia said of the 3-D printed looks. However, the high-tech textile wasn’t the designer’s only forward-thinking interpretation of Pringle’s signature knitwear. 

Leather embellishments on a diaphanous white dress mimicked a cardigan stitch—the tactile effect was slick, and it made more than a few of the audience to do a double take during its trip down the runway. Similarly, traditional pullovers were completely reimagined; in one instance, loosely woven threads were trapped inside a mesh casing. In another, fil coupe fragments in watery hues of green and violet were patched onto a roomy organdy jumper.

Water was a primary point of reference for Nicosia this season. Using Ophelia by Sir John Everett Millais and Pablo Picasso’s The Bathers as inspiration, he attempted to translate its lightness, transparency, and reflective properties into fabric. This resulted in a number of sheer silk tops with woven collars and sleeves. A few of them were covered in translucent turquoise triangles that protruded from the chest—they were meant to act as prisms. Elsewhere, silver beads were used sparingly on a honeycomb knit dress to provide just a hint of shimmer. That piece stood out for its serene simplicity.

Returning to Pringle’s heritage, Nicosia played with the idea of lingerie (the house manufactured undergarments back in the day), and turned out hyper-thin silk knit tanks and bodysuits. Pleated and leather-trimmed skirts felt a little stiff and lacked the liquidity of Nicosia’s refreshing dresses and tops, but on the whole, the designer produced an innovative—and versatile—Spring lineup that will appeal to loyal Pringle customers and beyond.

Shop the beautiful and elegant artwork of Pringle of Scotland Spring/Summer 2015 below:
 

 

 

 


Spring/Summer 2015 Lanvin

TWO years ago, Alber Elbaz celebrated his 10th anniversary at Lanvin (complete with karaoke from the designer himself no less), but tonight he was celebrating 125 years of the brand.

That’s a – cause for celebration, and b – cause for enlisting some of your favourite fashion friends to take to the catwalk for you – with Amber Valetta (all hair slicked back and in a slinky black column dress) among the model line-up. Edie Campbell later followed with a mop head of blonde ruffled hair, all louche and cool in a slouchy tuxedo.

And while there was no cake or karaoke from Alber this time (although there was a little dance – well, wiggle – from him at the end) what there was, was a breadth of clothes for a breadth of women to show just why and how Elbaz is a much adored designer at the house of Lanvin.

It began with sleek Grecian dresses, slit at the thigh, in navy, black and white, substantial jewellery clamped around the neck and a bag appearing with every look. These – elegant and gently draped numbers – seemed like a due and appropriate nod to Jeanne herself. We then moved on to Alber’s own repertoire – super sophisticated tailoring for today’s woman but with his rough edges and open seams for design distinction, followed by what we know and love him best for – party dresses.

They were less cocktail and punchy than we know from him (we’ve seen these in bright jewel shades), but you can’t help but think this was the designer stepping aside slightly in honour of the house. There all the same, they were molten and metallic and had his signature sumptuous luxe about them: lace, pearls, all together. Next it was on to a series of wafty and light printed tunic dresses, a modern and short bohemian riff on the Lanvin robe de style perhaps. They came in vivid yellow and red.
 
The take away from this collection was Elbaz’s ability to design and cater for a multitude of women – just as his model line-up proved. And that’s the key to Lanvin’s success right now.

 

To shop the glamorous world of Spring/Sumer 2015 Lanvin click below:
 

 

 

 


Spring/Summer 2015 Viktor & Rolf

VIKTOR & ROLF got bitten by the sportswear bug for their spring/summer 2015 collection today, unfamiliar territory for the duo who have a penchant for performance wares. Well, these were performance wares of a different variety – less froth and drama, more streamlined scuba shorts and leggings, jogging bottoms and little vests.

But they came with a side of extravagance and the unexpected – voluminous, inflated, gathered and twisted floral tops that used the torso as a canvas to create hugely contrasting shapes to the sleek nature of what was below. Not exactly practical for a workout.

These tops were draped and pulled and fashioned, entwined and tucked and there came a continuation of the sports note by the use of mesh on some of them too.

Sportswear has found itself providing the fashion fuel for many a designer collection these past few seasons so their dabbling into it now couldn’t help but feel a little late.


Spring/Summer 2015 Issey Miyake

At the end of the Issey Miyake show, there was a rare fashion moment as the audience stomped and cheered for designer Yoshiyuki Miyamae to take one more bow. It’s been a while since Issey featured as a must-see on the crowded fashion calendar, but anyone who goes to these shows regularly knows they’ll witness a special fusion of creativity, craftsmanship, intelligence, and plain old jaw drop. Well, maybe the special effects aren’t always jaw-dropping, but they usually elicit a heartily spontaneous reaction, as happened today when a handful of models walked onto the catwalk with organic portfolios that they rapidly unfolded and converted into springy, concertina-pleated items of clothing resembling the fun technical world of origami. The helpful explanatory notes on each guest’s seat described a process of “hand-pleating on the curve.”

Today’s theme was Miyamae’s excuse for a collection that focused on organic shapes and patterns to mesmerizing effect. Graphically abstracted prints created an almost Art Deco sense of movement, which was in tune with developments elsewhere in fashion this season. In fact, the graphics and silhouettes were generally more…what’s the best word for this?…familiar than they sometimes are: Tailored jackets and coats, slim pants tucked into boots, and oversize blanket wraps provided a context for the marriage of artisan and machine that creates purest Miyake. The technique du jour was steam-stretching, in which computers program steam heat to shrink jacquard fabrics into three-dimensional grooves. That mechanical process yielded gorgeously organic fabrics, patterned like tree rings, which Miyamae cut into poetic shapes that shivered sensuously as the models walked.

A line from the show notes, presumably endorsed by Issey himself, best defined the overall uplift of the show: “Cloth harbours the power of life: wrap yourself in it and feel an instantaneous metamorphosis into pure joy at the wonder of living.” Translation: For God’s sake, if it feels good, do it.

Click below to shop more of Spring/Summer 2015 Issey Miyake and explore the brands organic, origami and mesmerizing designs: