Spring/Summer 2015 Prada

Such is the excitement surrounding a Prada fashion show that spectators can’t help but make assumptions as soon as the invitation lands. Let’s see, a beige linen card coated in plastic. Not much to conclude from that. The next clue: the venue. This evening, Mrs. Prada’s space on Via Fogazzaro was decked out in rust-coloured deep pile carpet, while the centre of the room was filled with peaked dunes of lavender sand, tons of the stuff, sparkling under the spotlights – it filled the air with a sweet perfume and looked like it would zing on the tongue like sherbet, should one wish to try it.

These thoughts, and others, were racing through the mind until 42 minutes later when the wait was finally over. Out came Gemma Ward (after a six-year hiatus from the industry) dressed in a narrowly cut double-breasted black coat with Seventies collar and contrast lines of basic running stitch outlining the seams. The idea of craftsmanship here was prevalent. Edges on everything were left to fray, jagged hemlines on sheer toile-like skirts appeared as though they had been hacked off backstage, minutes before exiting. It all communicated an element of ownership, of wear and tear.

Her choice of vintage-style fabrics were opulent and seemed more suited to upholstering than dressmaking; heavy damasks, rich flocking and brocades – which were especially made for this collection (Mrs. Prada keen to do her part to keep the tradition and skill alive) – were all the sort of materials more commonly used for curtains or to renew a sofa. Here, they were cut up and mixed and matched together, or used as trims – off-cuts if you like – spliced into leather A-line skirts. Chinoiserie even got a look – in via oriental silk shirts layered under mustard ribbed knitted vests.

The soundtrack was Kiss Me, borrowed from The Ballad of Genesis and Lady Jaye, a film by Marie Losier that centres on the life and work of Genesis Breyer P-Orridge and his wife and collaborator Lady Jaye, it follows the sexual transformations they underwent during their Pandrogyne project, merging into one being. It was a provocative and powerful choice. Was Mrs. Prada merging the two worlds of the past and the future? The old with the new? It doesn’t really matter, these clothes were so spine-tingling good – and the accessories, too; clog boots and sublime bowling bags crafted from black crocodile with tan leather accents – she would be hard pushed to have found a record that didn’t set it all off with such emotional intensity.

To shop more Spring/Summer 2015 Prada visit: www.prada.com or if you love the shoes just as much as I do, click below now to shop the collection:
 

 

 

 


Birds of a Feather | Dressing Down the Traditional Embellishment

We’re used to seeing feathers on the red carpet and at the ballet, but the fancy fluff looks just as good on the street. We’ve spotted feathered coats, skirts, and even sandals on the show circuit, and mixed with casual knits and outerwear, they look special without being over-the-top.

1-pfashionwstyle1222-08-pfashionwstyle20 3-13-milan8Anna Dello Russo stepped out in an unraveling feathery dress.Ece Sukan mixed her feathered skirt with other textures, like a thick knit and fuzzy coat.

Looking for a piece of birds of a feather?! Click below now to shop the latest beautiful Feather garments and accessories and see if you are able to dress down the traditional embellishment:


Burberry’s Bohemian Rhapsody | 14/01/2015

00250h_1280x1920 00120h_320x480

No, I didn’t go to India – it was classic Bohemia and it just happened!” said Christopher Bailey as the last mirror-embroidered jacket disappeared in a haze of metallic confetti at the Burberry Prorsum men’s show.

This was a very fine presentation because Bailey pulled off a camouflage-meets-art nouveau look to men’s tailoring. It brought colour, pattern and texture into a Bohemian rhapsody – without breaking out of a youthful silhouette of skinny trousers and jackets from pea coats to bombers.

The Burberry show at London Collections: Men was a text-book vision of branding – and it suggests that things have only got better since Bailey took over management of the entire company, rather than just its fashion side.

With a heritage in the British military, a hippy-de-luxe vision might seem an uncomfortable fit. But Bailey put his models in eye-glasses, picked up his coloured crayons and made the collection seem credible.

It all started with the rigour of the floor and its black-and-white tiles. Or maybe with a live music performance by Clare Maguire. There is always the sense at Burberry that the brand has an over-arching vision in the way it shows – its pace, music and front row – as well as what it shows.

Out came the studious-looking hipsters (no long hippy hair, of course) carrying colourful tote bags and often with shirts, jackets or fringed shawls that were also juicy with colour and rich in small patterns. In these Woodstock-for-business outfits there was nothing to unhinge Burberry’s vision, yet plenty to desire as individual items.

At a time when a back-to-the-Seventies look has already become a fashion cliché, Bailey made clothes for real. The outfits were mannish, wearable and desirable – a fine lesson to other designers taking a more familiar hippy trail.

00030h_1280x1920 00180h_1280x1920

For More Burberry Prorsum visit www.burberry.com or click below now to shop the latest Burberry Prorsum men’s show:

 


Spring/Summer 2015 Gucci

When a house like Gucci taps into the Seventies it does it with a sense of conviction that’s unparalleled. The decade was a Gucci heyday and Frida Giannini, a Seventies girl at heart, must have delighted in the making of this spring collection.

It was convincing from the get-go: from the opening look – a narrow-shouldered button-through A-line skirt suit rendered in white leather – to the toffee-coloured suede coat dresses with stonking gold marine buttons; this collection zinged with confidence.

Blue denim – a Giannini favourite – was worked into swingy cropped culottes with exaggerated turn-ups and natty shirt dresses with maxi white shoelaces criss-crossing up the sleeves and across plunging necklines. Blousy boho dresses in subdued retro prints were topped with gilets bursting in deluxe patchworks, crafted from snakeskin, Mongolian and glossy goat hair.

The palette – and those furs and suedes leaned more towards autumn than summer – something that seems to be less of a trend and more of the norm in many of the collections to date. It’s now the job of the resort collections in which to flaunt summer colours and fabrics. These clothes will land in store in February, at a time when most of us aren’t thinking about shedding our coat – let alone much else.

Shorter hemlines did all point to one thing: the floor-skimming gown is officially over – suddenly, even the very idea of it seems outdated. Instead, Giannini proposed Oriental-style dresses with Mandarin collars and embroideries as precious as an antique piano shawl.

This collection had sass, glamour and commerciality in spades – and that’s not even counting the stacked heel suede boots and leather saddle bags in polished antique tan – everything in fact that women want from Gucci. Kate Moss and Charlotte Casiraghi (who is the new face of Gucci cosmetics – a new category debuting today with Pat McGrath as artistic director) applauded from the front row. Either one of them would look terrific in any and all of it.

To shop more Gucci visit: www.gucci.com or click below to shop the Spring/Summer 2015 Gucci collection: