Spring/Summer 2015 Pringle of Scotland

Massimo Nicosia wanted to incorporate plenty of Pringle of Scotland’s almost 200-year history into his Spring ’15 collection. He did it in a very contemporary, perhaps even futuristic way, continuing his experiments in 3-D printing, a technique he first employed (to much acclaim) for Fall. This time around, Nicosia created a nylon-powder chain mail. Assembled with panels of woven cotton and silk, it was used for airy, funky tops and a dress. “I wanted to combine the artificial and the natural,” Nicosia said of the 3-D printed looks. However, the high-tech textile wasn’t the designer’s only forward-thinking interpretation of Pringle’s signature knitwear. 

Leather embellishments on a diaphanous white dress mimicked a cardigan stitch—the tactile effect was slick, and it made more than a few of the audience to do a double take during its trip down the runway. Similarly, traditional pullovers were completely reimagined; in one instance, loosely woven threads were trapped inside a mesh casing. In another, fil coupe fragments in watery hues of green and violet were patched onto a roomy organdy jumper.

Water was a primary point of reference for Nicosia this season. Using Ophelia by Sir John Everett Millais and Pablo Picasso’s The Bathers as inspiration, he attempted to translate its lightness, transparency, and reflective properties into fabric. This resulted in a number of sheer silk tops with woven collars and sleeves. A few of them were covered in translucent turquoise triangles that protruded from the chest—they were meant to act as prisms. Elsewhere, silver beads were used sparingly on a honeycomb knit dress to provide just a hint of shimmer. That piece stood out for its serene simplicity.

Returning to Pringle’s heritage, Nicosia played with the idea of lingerie (the house manufactured undergarments back in the day), and turned out hyper-thin silk knit tanks and bodysuits. Pleated and leather-trimmed skirts felt a little stiff and lacked the liquidity of Nicosia’s refreshing dresses and tops, but on the whole, the designer produced an innovative—and versatile—Spring lineup that will appeal to loyal Pringle customers and beyond.

Shop the beautiful and elegant artwork of Pringle of Scotland Spring/Summer 2015 below:
 

 

 

 


Spring/Summer 2015 Marc Jacobs

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A BUBBLE GUM pink suburban house sits on pink gravel in the Park Lane Armoury. The audience are seated on banks of shagpile pink carpeted benches and each given a pair of Beats by Dr Dre headphones to wear for the show. Through the headphones a disembodied voice intones instructions: “Bring out the crooked smile and the backpack”; “Go into the house and take a shower”.

Is he talking to the Marc Jacobs army parading around the exterior of the house in military serge with their mandarin-collared jackets and oversized buttons? Is he controlling the girls with their shaggy black bobs and their satin-belted army style? Who is he?

Fashion shows as theatre is something Jacobs is a master of and possibly it distracts from seeing the clothes for what they are. Certainly some of the details like the huge resin buttons, the macramé lace inserts, the rich luxury of the wool and linen were of the highest quality. It didn’t look much like a spring/summer collection but the glitter-strapped sliders will no doubt be on everyone’s wish list any day now.

To become part of the Marc Jacobs army click below and shop Spring/Summer 2015 Marc Jacobs now:
 

 

 


Spring/Summer 2015 Emilio Pucci

THAT Seventies Show – is fast becoming the way to sum up Milan Fashion Week, from Gucci to Prada and onto Emilio Pucci.

“It’s always resonated with me. I think it’s a reaction,” said Pucci creative director Peter Dundas backstage by way of explanation. “I really wanted to do it last time so just thought I’m just going to do it.” Fair enough.

Whether the fashion forces of Milan got together to conspire in favour of the era or not, it’s on next summer’s agenda for sure – but it just depends on what kind of Seventies spirit you are.

“It’s my girls,” said Dundas, referring to Poppy Delevingne who was bejewelled and Pucci-fied out front. What he meant was that bohemian and carefree spirit – but situated in a contemporary context.

And this was very much a happy-hippy collection: plunge-neck crochet dresses embroidered with flowers, be-tasselled ponchos of the same effect, wispy butterfly-billowing maxi dresses, psychedelic shades and prints of Zap ice lolly optics, waistcoats, skinny suits, flares – tick, tick, tick for the Seventies. There were even those orange and brown colour clashes.

Halter necks, empire lines, gypsy tops and gilets – the repertoire continued as a mash-up of Fleetwood Mac played out – and then Naomi Campbell took a turn on the catwalk.

With all its colour and exotic psychedelic prints, Pucci is a brand that sits well in the Seventies – and will do in the second wave of the Noughties with so many trend boxes ticked this season.

Click below and shop the vibrant collection of Spring/Summer 2015 Emilio Pucci:
 

 

 

 

 

 


Spring/Summer 2015 Christian Dior

WOW. And in one fell swoop Raf Simons redefined what modern is. And that didn’t mean sci-fi futuristic or normcore anodyne.

What it meant was an incredible collection that continued on from where his couture show started off in July and gave us historical clothes and references like we’ve never seen them before.

“I started to think ‘What is modern?'” explained Simons in his show notes. “It was an idea of confronting what people now think is an aesthetic that is modern – it felt more modern to go to the far past, not the ‘modernised’ look of the last decade.”

And in doing so he managed to make history look new and modern look old. Never have frock coats or tapestry cuffs and turn-ups looked so appealing, relevant and real.

So he borrowed – and sweetly added a “strict” accuracy disclaimer in the notes – from the Eighteenth century onwards for a collection that somehow managed to combine the French royal court with the uniforms of pilots and astronauts, school girls and skaters and make it all cool, all utterly desirable and leaving the audience, frankly, wanting more.

Court coats in bright cerise or marigold worn with skate shorts; bar jacket dresses punctuated with poppers instead of buttons on the hip; high Edwardian collars that could so easily drift into the realms of scuba wear; vest-top dresses that revived his full skirt and top combinations from his first couture season even; languid night dresses; leather-laced jackets belted on an empire line; flashes of rich embroidery here and there and just when you least expected. This was everything and more, and on paper probably shouldn’t have made sense. Yet it did – it was a revelation.

“The challenge was to bring the attitude of contemporary reality to something very historical; bringing easiness to something that could be perceived as theatrical,” elaborated Simons. “It is the attitude that matters.”

There was drama, there was character and there was fantasy here – a collection that will appeal to Dior customers old and new (everyone’s wearing those bejewelled couture trainers of his right now). And there was tangibility.

Move over normcore, Raf’s ignited a renaissance.

Need some summer inspiration, click below to shop spring/summer 2015 Christian Dior: